Essays, Pg 2

Why I Love Farming
I looked at your web site last week and commented on some of your pics and realaized that everytime I see a picture of a really neat farm or a picture of an animal that is attractive or unusual, several things happen.  First thing that happens is that I marvel at someones initiative to actually take the time to take pictures.  The picture itself usually gives me a warm fuzzy feeling and nostalgic recolections of a wonderful time and life gone by.   I grew up on a farm where my dad always encouraged me to do the right thing by his animals, equipment and the environment.  Farmers and ranchers were my heros and dad was my number one hero because he always did the right thing.  Farming was a positive influence on my life and I challenge anyone that has ever walked out on a spring morning with the birds singing and looked at animals grazing on lush green pastures to say that it didn’t give them a peacful and content feeling.  Look at a picture of someones farm in Iowa or Minnesota with one of those old barns and silos and crops growing in the field and tell me that you wouldn’t like to be there in person and experience the feeling you have first hand.  I am not good at writing an essay but I am a great farmer and rancher and would like nothing better than to have my sons and daughter and grandkids to follow in my footsteps, tracking right along in my fathers big footsteps and those of his father before him.  I love the land, the animals, the culture, the work, the lifestyle and most of all, I love the Lord for giving me the opportunity to live the life of a simple farmer and rancher.  That is why I love farming.
If I were to win this heifer calf, which is pretty remote, the calf would be given to my 14 year old grandaughter Kalee.  She too loves animals and would raise the heifer and do an awesome job of it.  Kalee would show the calf and then keep her to milk when she calved.

Roy A.

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Why I Love Farming:
My husband (then boyfriend) and I started farming together in 2000.  Our relationship and my relationship with farming have followed the same sweet, shocking, powerful, sometimes dirty, sometimes blissful path.  At first I loved the idea…cooking newly harvested vegetables, drinking fresh milk, knowing where my meat came from.  At first I loved my partner the same way…all that we would do together and someday know about each other.  We whispered whimsical plans and dreamed of sunset tractor rides together. As the years passed with farming I loved the sunrises and the still of early morning hours, being close to the surface of life and death, the contentment at the end of a long, hard day.  With my husband I loved our evolution as a couple, watching how he interacted with the land and animals, changing how we grow and produce food for ourselves and others.
These days I love sharing the farm with my family. I love seeing my daughter eat strawberries off the vine, knowing the difference between kale and collards,  and being part of raising her own chickens and sheep.  I felt the first pangs of labor while milking a friend’s cow after she injured her hand an hour before milking time.  I continued milking, leaning into her warm, soft body with every contraction, listening to her steady breath.  I thought about that sweet cow throughout the labor and imagined leaning into her when I needed comfort.  My daughter Ruby was born after many hours of dreaming about that cow.  Ruby is now 2 1/2 and she practically lives on cow milk.  It can’t possibly be a coincidence!
That’s what I love about farming…
After seeing the site and realizing that Amethyst’s mother’s name is Ruby I thought I had to write.  Amethyst would join our 3 year old jersey Alice and live on Mountain View Farm at Blue Ridge Center for Environmental Stewardship in northern Virginia.  We lease a farm from a nature preserve and environmental education center.  We primarily raise vegetables for a business and raise animals for our home use.  We are a working farm but partner with our landowners (Blue Ridge Center) and offer education around agriculture.  Alice has a 6 acre pasture and we rotate her through fresh areas throughout the seasons.
Thank you again.
All my best,
Shawna D
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I LOVE Dairy

I’m Ellie F. and I am a Jr. in 4-H.  I am 8 years old and this will be my second year showing dairy heifers.  This will be my first year doing junior showing so I get judged more competitively.  I like all kinds of animals but if I had to pick a favorite it would be a dairy cow.

I have lots of experience on the farm with my brother’s cow MD-Dunloafin Maryann.  I like to bond with the cows and give them all nicknames because they seem to respond to them.  Right now I have all Holsteins and I am looking for another breed.

Whenever the cows see me leave when I am done playing with them, they always moo for more!  The cows at my farm always like to play and they are trained to recognize the people that around so they won’t hurt a single person.  The calf I showed last year is MD-Maple Dell Debonair Isra.  I have 2 heifers at my farm now that are good with other calves, yearlings, and cows.  They will be very friendly to Amethyst and they will be very happy to meet her.  The 2 yearlings that want to meet Amethyst are Lexi and Izzy.

At our farm we go take care of the cows every morning. On school days my dad does it by himself.  I help my cows by giving fresh bedding and feeding them grain.  When I go down to their barn I take long walks with them on their halters and I have a special communication with my yearling, Izzy. She is the best of all. We just got a new barn and we have a nice area for Amethyst to play in. Amethyst will not go thirsty because we have an electric water pump and it keeps their water from freezing.   If the grain is all gone, she can have as much hay as she wants because we grow hay on our farm. I live on a 22 acre farm so there is plenty of room for Amethyst.

I love farming because it is a way that I show that I am different and it is the lifestyle for me.  I’d rather live at my farm than anywhere else in the world.  The kinds of animals I have are fish, chickens, dogs and calves and I am getting a cat soon. Our neighbors have horses near the cow pasture so the cows get to see them.

In the summertime when the hay gets really tall, my brother and I love to go play in the hay.  We like to run around the whole field and make things out of hay.  My cousins also come to play with us because the field is so huge.  We make houses out of hay and we make paths to each other’s rooms.  We turn our playhouse into a post office and leave mail for each other in each person’s hay house.  Anybody can play this game as long as you have a good imagination.

There are lots of things I like to do, but I think the best thing in the world would definitely be farming!

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My name is David C. and I am nine years old. I live with my parents and my brother in Middleton, Tennessee. I am in the third grade in Middleton Elementary School. My hobbies are team roping, reading, going to church, and playing with my dogs.We have a great pyrenees, australian shepard, and a maltese. Our farm is called Green Acres.

I like farming so much because it is fun and you get tasty food and drinks. One of my favorite drinks to make is hot chocolate from our own cows milk. I did chores until I got enough money to buy one Brangus bull calf. Now the calf is happy and playing in the field. We also have three Jersey milk cows and one American Milking Devon cow in milk and one American Milking Devon heifer. We also have two American Milking Devon bull calves. We also have bees and chickens and a garden.

One of my chores that I love is to get the eggs. I also go and help my mom milk the cows in the evenings. We just got bees last year and helped extract the honey, put it in jars,and share it with friends. I want to be home schooled so I can help more. My favorite food from the garden is watermelon and corn. I also like to get hay on the tractor with my dad. Another reason I like farming so much is because you learn a lot. I learned that chickens eat ticks and worms. I also learned a lot about bees and cows. I would feed the calf everyday and take care of her. I would train her to walk on the halter and teach her to go into the stanchion and what a milking machine is. We will hand milk her if she does not like the milking machine. We have a barn with walls for shelter. I think she will have friends if I win the contest. We have all this and a house on forty acres.

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Why I Love Farming

By Caitlin K.

Farming and ranching are much more than just a job. The official term for our lifestyles – agriculture – means just that, a culture built on agri, which is the Latin term for farmer. Our country, whether they wish to admit it or not, is built on a culture of farmers. It is estimated that the average American is at least two generations removed from the farm if not more. Thankfully, small family farms have been gradually pushed to the forefront of activism and aid. Agriculture is my life. I’m currently living in a city and, quite frankly, I’m going crazy. This apartment, no matter how affordable and convenient it is, is absolutely no replacement for the fresh air and grass back home.

When I first entered high school I wasn’t entirely sure what I wanted to be, but to be a farmer wasn’t an option because I didn’t know that it could be a “real” job. I was in 4-H and showed rabbits and poultry but every parent on the farms that I knew had off-farm jobs too. I gradually got involved with my school’s FFA chapter and learned that, in fact, I could be a farmer for a living. There were also a lot of other jobs within agriculture that I could do.

I’m currently attending the University of Wyoming to major in Agriculture Education, Animal and Veterinary Science option. My family is back home in Michigan and my parents are trying very hard to get their small farm going. My parents both were raised in rural lifestyles but are both a generation off of the farm so they’re still learning. I admire my parent’s zeal and love for agriculture and farm life. My younger siblings are learning about farming alongside my parents. I relay information from here at school to my family to help them along their way.

Next year, 2012, I hope to be attending Michigan State University so that I may be closer to my family. My little sister wants to show dairy cattle and fell in love with a Jersey heifer at the county fair. If I win this heifer, I want to find a way to transport her back to my family in Michigan so that my younger sister has an animal to start showing with and so that my parents have a great asset to produce a beef calf and milk for their own use.

Why do I love farming?

I lived in Wyoming for two years during high school. I was dating a less than lovely young man who lived on a beautiful big ranch. Up until then my experience was limited to FFA and show livestock. I remember standing at the top of the stack of thousand pound hay bales, watching the black cows graze and the creek trickle down one side of the pasture. The air that I breathed was the most delicious air I’ve ever experienced. Sure it smelled like cattle and grass but it smelled amazing. I knew at that moment that this is where I wanted to be. Maybe not on that ranch, because I wasn’t going to stay with this boy, but a farm or ranch of my own where I can sit on the haystack and breath and no one can stop me.

It’s a twenty four hour, seven days a week job, but I wouldn’t give it up for the world.

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I like farming so much, because its fun to pet on our cows and feed the chickens. I like to look out the window and see cows in the field eating grass with a bunch of chickens scattered between them .I also like to see the new calves and cows that we get. I also like farming because you get a lot of tasty things honey,watermelons,and milk. I like to farm because you get to pet on your cows and all the other animals. It’s like watching TV when the cows do something funny we all laugh and we enjoy watching them play and wander.We have four american milking devon one is a cow that we milk twice a day and three are calves that we take very good care of and love. We also have a jersey that is a very good nurse cow and will take almost any calf that we give her. She hasn’t turned one down yet!

I have learned a lot about animals,but mostly how much work it is to take care of them and how much they cost. I take care of our chickens and close them up at night. I also learned a lot about cow and how much milk they give. Our cows give about two gallons,but our jersey gives more than that. I learned a lot about bees too! I learned how to build bee boxes and extract honey. This year we got one-hundred-and-twenty-five pounds of honey. I learned a lot from the Keeping A Family Cow Forum or KFC. Not the restaurant the forum!

If we get the calf we can either put her an our nurse cow or feed her grain. i have been saving money for a calf and would really want this one. we have forty acres that the calf can graze on and can drink from our lake. we will take very good care of the calf if we get it and when it rains it can go in the barn to stay dry and warm with the other cows. In the winter it can eat grain and hay.

When I grow up I want to have a big farm and chickens and cows. I want to have a garden and dogs and cats. I want to have a garden and probably more!!!

Jimmy C.

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Why I love Farming

There is no physical reason why anyone should love farming, because the work is really hard and the hours are grueling. No, there must be a deep emotional reason to love farming. As for myself, there is no other thing I love more than farming. Yes, the work is hard and yes, the hours of sleep lost due to an orphaned creature are precious, but there is nothing else I want. Nothing. Why? There are so many other things I could do, things that are easier, things that pay better, and things that might not be so stomach-turning ( which, you must admit, farming can be some times). Then if some things are easier than farming, why farm? Well, why not? I love farming because you get to see LIFE!! New life, old life, growing life. For anyone that has ever held a newborn creature, be it lamb, calf, human or gerbil, will instantly agree with me that nothing could be more fulfilling, more beautiful, any sweeter. But, farming is more than just animals, farming is also about planting crops. So, every spring and fall, gardening season rolls around. Break out the shovels, somebody!! Dirt gets turned over, manure gets worked in, and earthworms begin to surface themselves. Then you get to plant what you eventually will eat or feed others. How much cooler can you get? Zucchini, peas, watermelon: if it can be found in the produce section, you can grow it (unless you live in Alaska, because you can’t really grow a whole lot of fruit there). Weeks of waiting pass, and then what happens? Life. New life, budding life, growing life. Now, I would not miss out on that feeling for the world, especially to be in a cubicle from 9 to 5, never seeing sunlight. As one of seven precious children, a Jersey calf would become an invaluable asset as soon as she entered the property. I would teach her to be hand-milked as soon as possible. When she matures, her milk will undoubtedly be used and drunk by us and everyone on our street. We have 4.8 acres of grazing land for her, and tons of playmates next to her in the form of sheep. I hope everyone who reads this will understand that, even if you are just growing two tomatoes in a window box, you are still witnessing daily the wonderful, God-given miracle of LIFE.

McKayla M.

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Why I Love Farming

My name is Mitchell F. and I am a junior 4-Her in the Howard County Dairy Club.  I have been showing Holstein cows for 3 years and I am anxious to try something new, like showing Jersey’s.

At our farm we have 2 yearlings and one calf so Amethyst would not get lonely.  I help my dad on weekends and when we are not in school.  We always give fresh bedding, hay and grain to our animals.  They have an electric watering system so they will not run out of water and it will not freeze in the winter.

One of the yearlings, Lexi, is mine.  I also have a cow that will be 3 years old on March 1st and she is at our friend’s dairy farm because we don’t have the supplies to milk her two times per day.  She is only 1 mile away so it is easy to visit her.  Her name is Trixie and she had a heifer calf on February 24, 2011.  I am very happy because she had a bull calf last year and we had to sell him.

Today is my birthday and the new calf, Michelle, is 2 days old.  We collected milk from her mom and fed Michelle with a bottle. Today we switched her to a powdered milk replacer for the first time. She is a very hungry calf and is eating well.  My dad is giving me the job of feeding her, sterilizing her bottle and keeping her bedding clean.  I like this job because it makes me feel important.

I’ve learned a lot about showing and I am old enough to handle and show larger animals.  But, I miss the fun, gentle and sweet personality of a calf and training them for the fair.  My younger sister needs a smaller calf, so I will give her my new calf, Michelle.  I would like to show a calf this summer, too, and a winter calf like Amethyst would be a good fit for me.

I like farming because you get to drive tractors, have fun with animals and have a lot of space.  My friends like to come here because we have 10 times more space than they do in their neighborhoods.  We have a perfect place to go camping and I ride my 4-wheeler when the hay is cut down.  My dad taught me how to drive tractors safely when I was younger and I am always careful when I help him.

We don’t just have cows. We have chickens and dogs and soon I hope to get a pig to show in 4-H for the first time. We grow hay in our field and in the fall we will plant wheat.

I have been in 4-H since I was 5 years old.  I did crafts, baking, photography and vegetables when I was little.   I have been showing dairy for 3 years and I have been in the Bulls Eyes shooting club for 2 years.  In 2009 I won a Farm Bureau contest and was named Future Farmer for Howard County.

My dad was raised on a dairy farm and he loved the way he grew up.  He is helping me to learn and enjoy farming by teaching me how to raise and show animals in 4-H.

If I win Amethyst I will take care of her, feed her and love her with all my heart.   My mom says she is a perfect match for me because my birthstone is an Amethyst.

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The sun rises and warms the sky with hues of red and orange. Barn coat, muck boots, hat, barn gloves, and compost pail in hand I head out the cow shed for my morning routine.  Feathery bodies waddling up to the fence, fifty or so of our flock of chickens who await the compost bin and treats greet me.  Then the symphony of baa’s and moo’s from the cow shed as I continue towards our four female goats: Piper, Pepper, Snickers, and Rose and one heifer shorthorn, Peek-a-Boo.  “Good morning girls,” I call to them and the symphony continues.  Once the girls are have food in her respective bowls, Boo get a brushing and rub down.  This is how I begin each morning and why I love farming.

Our family is truly blessed to have the land to raise animals and garden crops.  We are continually adding more sustainable ideas onto our farm, which was a tobacco farm for so long.  The addition of the cow was a move to be more sustainable family.  The cow and goats eat mostly in the 5 acres of grazing land and hay that was cut from our fields.

Why buy a cow, when you can buy milk at the grocery store? In the state of Maryland, raw milk is illegal to buy or sale. So   Peek-a-boo will be my legal way to access raw milk. Once the white gold is flowing, I will begin another journey of cheese making. I have toured a facility on the Eastern Shore, Chapel’s Country Creamery that supplies the Whole Foods of Annapolis with yogurt and various cheeses.

If our family wins this contest, Amethyst would live with Peek-a-boo and our goats.  She would be loved and breed for her milk.  As a homeschooling farming moma, I try to give our children the skills to live sustainably and to be stewards of our family farm.

BY: Denny W.

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I am not much of an essay writer but one thing I can do is talk about animals and especially my cows! I am 32 years old and in April of 2010 I bought my grandparents home place that they established in 1941. At the time it was an 82 acre farm but over the years has been sold off to family members and I now own the rest. I am so proud to own the family farm and after my Papa died some 20 years ago my Grandma who was not an animal lover like my Papa was removed any barns, fence, etc. Well having a farm has always been a dream of mine, not to eat the meat or sell for food but just as a hobby farm to enjoy these beautiful creatures that God created….FIRST. Even before us! So while remodeling the house I immediately started fencing and building chicken coops, pig lots, run-ins and now am waiting for my lumber delivery for my new barn! I started out with the chickens, then 3 goats and 2 sheep, then a couple of pigs, 2 turkeys, 2 donkeys and then my Therby! He is my Jersey bull calf that I bought at 3 days old. I have bottle fed him since and still do. He is as tame and spoiled as you have ever seen. My Dad who grew up with cows told me he had never seen one that small walking on a lead rope or will lie down and put his head in my lap if I sit on the ground. Then of course I was in search for a heifer. I have plans of milking my own cow and churning butter so I have already purchased an antique Dazey churn to do this. Anyway, like most people I am on a budget so I go in search for my Jersey heifer. They are fairly expensive as you know so I did lots of looking and found one 3 hours away at a good price….this is my precious MayBell. She and Therby are only 3 days apart so she too is on a bottle and both are eating starter feed, hay and drinking lots of water now. They are so beautiful and the sweetest babies I have ever seen. I love talking to all of my animals and as my Dad told a man the other day “she does a great job and loves them all”. Now I know I need to get back on the subject of why I love to farm. You know in our busy lives we work, raise kids and have so much stress that we do not get to enjoy the good things in life and to me that is farming! I am big hearted so nothing gets eat on my farm except the eggs! Like I said God did make the animals first and they know how to love better than we do and my farming is like therapy to me. After a hard day or a stressful week there is nothing like spending my evening or weekends with my animals. I love when the babies are born and even though it is hard when it comes time to find them new homes I know that it has to be done and the small amount of profit helps to keep my little farm running! I love the simple life that a farm gives you and looking out my bathroom window in the mornings and seeing them grazing in the wide open pastures that I have made for them. I like learning and experiencing things my grandparents did when they were raising animals on the very same farm. I like to tell people when they say “why do you work so hard out here or how do you have the time”, I say with the economy like it is, if it gets worse and times get harder, I will know how to survive. I do work very hard to build and fence to provide all the room and shelter my animals need but it is not like work to me, I love it! I wish everybody could feel the way I do about these animals that way there would not be any of them being mistreated and abused. I am thankful for a very supportive husband that helps me and knows how important they all are to me. I love talking about my farm and having people bring their children out to see and pet my animals but of them all my two calves have brought me a tremendous amount of joy in the last few months and I would love to be able to have another young heifer to grow up with my two but, they are costly and I make sure that I do not overextend myself so that I am always able to provide for their food, shelter and any vet bills needed. One thing is for sure, if I am chosen she will have a loving, forever home and will be well taken care of! Jerseys are my favorite. Before I chose my two I read many books and stories but was already sold because of those big ole eyes they have. That is the one thing that has drawn me right into them. Just like now when I feed Therby and MayBell I love to see them big eyes looking up at me, I just don’t understand who would not! Well to wrap up my attempt at this essay, I have all that I need to care for SPIRITED ROSE and plenty of love to go around!

Thank you so much for this opportunity,

Valicia I.

I am not much of an essay writer but one thing I can do is talk about animals and especially my cows! I am 32 years old and in April of 2010 I bought my grandparents home place that they established in 1941. At the time it was an 82 acre farm but over the years has been sold off to family members and I now own the rest. I am so proud to own the family farm and after my Papa died some 20 years ago my Grandma who was not an animal lover like my Papa was removed any barns, fence, etc. Well having a farm has always been a dream of mine, not to eat the meat or sell for food but just as a hobby farm to enjoy these beautiful creatures that God created….FIRST. Even before us! So while remodeling the house I immediately started fencing and building chicken coops, pig lots, run-ins and now am waiting for my lumber delivery for my new barn! I started out with the chickens, then 3 goats and 2 sheep, then a couple of pigs, 2 turkeys, 2 donkeys and then my Therby! He is my Jersey bull calf that I bought at 3 days old. I have bottle fed him since and still do. He is as tame and spoiled as you have ever seen. My Dad who grew up with cows told me he had never seen one that small walking on a lead rope or will lie down and put his head in my lap if I sit on the ground. Then of course I was in search for a heifer. I have plans of milking my own cow and churning butter so I have already purchased an antique Dazey churn to do this. Anyway, like most people I am on a budget so I go in search for my Jersey heifer. They are fairly expensive as you know so I did lots of looking and found one 3 hours away at a good price….this is my precious MayBell. She and Therby are only 3 days apart so she too is on a bottle and both are eating starter feed, hay and drinking lots of water now. They are so beautiful and the sweetest babies I have ever seen. I love talking to all of my animals and as my Dad told a man the other day “she does a great job and loves them all”. Now I know I need to get back on the subject of why I love to farm. You know in our busy lives we work, raise kids and have so much stress that we do not get to enjoy the good things in life and to me that is farming! I am big hearted so nothing gets eat on my farm except the eggs! Like I said God did make the animals first and they know how to love better than we do and my farming is like therapy to me. After a hard day or a stressful week there is nothing like spending my evening or weekends with my animals. I love when the babies are born and even though it is hard when it comes time to find them new homes I know that it has to be done and the small amount of profit helps to keep my little farm running! I love the simple life that a farm gives you and looking out my bathroom window in the mornings and seeing them grazing in the wide open pastures that I have made for them. I like learning and experiencing things my grandparents did when they were raising animals on the very same farm. I like to tell people when they say “why do you work so hard out here or how do you have the time”, I say with the economy like it is, if it gets worse and times get harder, I will know how to survive. I do work very hard to build and fence to provide all the room and shelter my animals need but it is not like work to me, I love it! I wish everybody could feel the way I do about these animals that way there would not be any of them being mistreated and abused. I am thankful for a very supportive husband that helps me and knows how important they all are to me. I love talking about my farm and having people bring their children out to see and pet my animals but of them all my two calves have brought me a tremendous amount of joy in the last few months and I would love to be able to have another young heifer to grow up with my two but, they are costly and I make sure that I do not overextend myself so that I am always able to provide for their food, shelter and any vet bills needed. One thing is for sure, if I am chosen she will have a loving, forever home and will be well taken care of! Jerseys are my favorite. Before I chose my two I read many books and stories but was already sold because of those big ole eyes they have. That is the one thing that has drawn me right into them. Just like now when I feed Therby and MayBell I love to see them big eyes looking up at me, I just don’t understand who would not! Well to wrap up my attempt at this essay, I have all that I need to care for SPIRITED ROSE and plenty of love to go around!

Thank you so much for this opportunity,

Valicia Inman

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Why I Love Farming!

By:  Erica B.

For most people it might be the animals or the equipment but for me it is the memories and the treasured special moments.  I did not grow up on a farm but we did rent some land with a barn to keep our horses.  My grandparents however do live on a farm.  I cherish the memories of the weeks we spent during our childhood summers on their farm.

My grandfather always made breakfast for us.  He would put a variety of ingredients, including dried vegetables, into our pancakes and bless his soul they were often the color of the cast iron skillet he used to make them.  We would go outside every day in anticipation of the “farm work” we would do.  Grandpa often took us down to the barn workshop.  We spent countless hours digging a cool spot for Gretel and Sheba, the dogs, to lay in.  Grandpa always had a project for us to work on.  We made gifts for our parents and tinkered around everywhere.  We swam and ran around like little hooligans.

When my parents rented the land to keep our horses I had to get up and drive the three miles to the barn to feed the horses before school.  I did it every day.  I can remember the day I got a rude awakening when I reached into the grain bin and grabbed something furry instead of the feed scoop.  The rat wasn’t too happy either.  There was also the day that I cheated and instead of opening the electric fence to go through I ducked under it with four metal coffee cans in my hand.  I was never lazy about my chores after that.

My husband also did not grow up on a farm but just like me his grandparents had a farm.  To this day if he smells candles he will comment that it reminds him of his grandparent’s home.  They didn’t have electricity.  He can describe it in detail and paint a picture in your mind that makes you feel as though you are there.  When he describes the “donkey” it makes me giggle but it reminds me of the ingenuity of early farmers.  His grandparent’s “donkey” was a tank of water that was elevated in the air.  They lit a fire under the tank to heat the water and then the water flowed through a pipe into the house.  This seems so primitive but it was the mid nineteen hundreds in South Africa.  I think his favorite part though would have been the fresh milk.  I don’t know whether it’s true or not but he says that when he was milking the cows he would squirt it right into his mouth.  Knowing him, it’s true.

We are finally on a farm ourselves.  Each day I delight in looking out the window while doing the dishes or making dinner and seeing my husband working on the fence or in the barn.  Our daughters cannot wait to get out and work with him. I cannot wait for them to learn about getting up again when they fall off their pony, how to build and create, or to watch a garden grow.  So many of life’s lessons can be learned on a farm.  The animals and equipment may come and go but the memories, the treasures of farm life are forever etched in our hearts.

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